Variations in cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden between West and South European countries are rarely reported. To address this knowledge gap, The Lancet Regional Health-Europe convened experts from a broad range of countries to assess the current state of knowledge of cardiovascular disease inequalities across Europe. This Review is specifically focused on West and South European countries. Mortality, risk factor and economic data for nine West European and six South European countries were sourced from the World Health Organisation, the Global Burden of Disease study and the World Bank. Healthcare data were collected by survey of participating countries. A key finding was of declines in age-standardised mortality rates (ASMRs) across all countries since 1990. In 2019 rates per 100,000 were lower in West European countries in males (279.7 (264.1-335.9) vs 337.2 (323.7-367.2)) and females (196.2 (183.3-228.8) vs 247.3 (232.2-268.3)). Differences in risk factor exposures were small, with the exception of physical activity and dietary factors, but across all countries the prevalence of obesity has increased, affecting >20% of adults in 2019. Healthcare delivery in 2019 showed inequalities with cardiovascular procedure rates lower in South compared with West European countries. Further declines in ASMRs in West and South European countries will require population strategies to reduce obesity and address inequalities in physical activity and dietary factors. Reducing the gap in procedure rates is unlikely to match the beneficial effects of population strategies for reducing CVD burden in South European countries.Copyright (c) 2023 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Cardiovascular disease care and outcomes in West and South European countries

Torbica, Aleksandra;
2023

Abstract

Variations in cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden between West and South European countries are rarely reported. To address this knowledge gap, The Lancet Regional Health-Europe convened experts from a broad range of countries to assess the current state of knowledge of cardiovascular disease inequalities across Europe. This Review is specifically focused on West and South European countries. Mortality, risk factor and economic data for nine West European and six South European countries were sourced from the World Health Organisation, the Global Burden of Disease study and the World Bank. Healthcare data were collected by survey of participating countries. A key finding was of declines in age-standardised mortality rates (ASMRs) across all countries since 1990. In 2019 rates per 100,000 were lower in West European countries in males (279.7 (264.1-335.9) vs 337.2 (323.7-367.2)) and females (196.2 (183.3-228.8) vs 247.3 (232.2-268.3)). Differences in risk factor exposures were small, with the exception of physical activity and dietary factors, but across all countries the prevalence of obesity has increased, affecting >20% of adults in 2019. Healthcare delivery in 2019 showed inequalities with cardiovascular procedure rates lower in South compared with West European countries. Further declines in ASMRs in West and South European countries will require population strategies to reduce obesity and address inequalities in physical activity and dietary factors. Reducing the gap in procedure rates is unlikely to match the beneficial effects of population strategies for reducing CVD burden in South European countries.Copyright (c) 2023 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
2023
2023
Timmis, Adam; Kazakiewicz, Dzianis; Torbica, Aleksandra; Townsend, Nick; Huculeci, Radu; Aboyans, Victor; Vardas, Panos
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11565/4061578
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